Weight and Your Prostate

Posted January 31, 2017 at 8:25PM

Prostate enlargement is a normal part of male aging, but that doesn’t mean you have no control over the process. New research published in the Journal of Neurourology suggests the growth of your prostate might have something to do with your waistline.

The Study Details

A group of Korean researchers led by Dr. Jae Hung Jung (Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine) looked at records from 571 men who had gone to their doctors for a prostate examination.

They found that men with larger prostates also tended to have larger waist circumferences, higher weight, and higher BMI. As waist circumference, weight and BMI increased, the risk of developing high-volume BPH also increased.

My Take on Weight Management for a Healthy Prostate

I’m a naturopathic urologist and functional medicine doctor. That means that my goal (some would say my obsession) is finding natural ways to prevent and treat chronic health problems. I want to make your body as healthy as possible so that it can fight disease on its own whenever possible. I hate prescribing drugs; I’d rather find the cause of your illness and eliminate it.

That said, a study like this says exactly what I like to hear. But it’s not the first of its kind; many other studies have shown that a healthy weight is protective against BPH (Parsons, Sarma, McVary & Wei, 2013; Zhao et al., 2016). A study like this means that we have a better idea of the cause of BPH (although we still don’t know definitively), so we can treat it with harmless lifestyle changes.

This kind of scientific evidence is the backbone of my practice...

What You Should Do

I have a couple basic guidelines for people who want to lose weight: eat right, exercise at least 30 minutes a day, and get enough sleep. Cut out processed foods as much as possible.

If you haven’t already committed to a weight goal this year, now is the time. Your prostate will thank you.

Researchers continue to find more evidence to support the idea that the way we live can help or hurt us in big ways. Shedding some extra pounds can make a difference for the health of your whole body, including your prostate.

I've written an entire book on the subject. You can grab a free copy right here.

Be well.

Stay Tuned and Stay Well,

dr. geo

Dr. Geo

Geo Espinosa, N.D., L.Ac, C.N.S., is a renowned naturopathic doctor recognized as an authority in integrative management of male and urological conditions. Dr. Geo is the founder and director of the Integrative Urology Center at New York University Langone Medical Center (NYULMC), a center of excellence in research and integrative treatments for urological conditions.

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Learn more at Dr.Geo.com.

References:

Jung, J. H., Ahn, S. V., Song, J. M., Chang, S.-J., Kim, K. J., Kwon, S. W., … Koh, S.-B. (2016). Obesity as a Risk Factor for Prostatic Enlargement: A Retrospective Cohort Study in Korea. International Neurourology Journal, 20(4), 321–328. http://doi.org/10.5213/inj.1632584.292

Parsons, J. K., Sarma, A. V., McVary, K., & Wei, J. T. (2013). Obesity and benign prostatic hyperplasia: clinical connections, emerging etiological paradigms and future directions. The Journal of urology, 189(1), S102-S106.

Zhao, S.-C., Xia, M., Tang, J.-C., & Yan, Y. (2016). Associations between metabolic syndrome and clinical benign prostatic hyperplasia in a northern urban Han Chinese population: A prospective cohort study. Scientific Reports, 6, 33933. http://doi.org/10.1038/srep33933

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